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BOSTON 
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COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Board of Higher Education 




Division of Immigration and Americanization 



FORTY NINTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



July 1, 1965-June 30, 1966 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
THE BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 



DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 



MAIN OFFICE 



BOSTON, Mass. 



Room 208, Tremont Building 
73 Tremont Street 
Telephones CApitol 7-0719 
Supervisor of Social Service 
Mrs, Teofilia K. Tattan 



FALL RIVER, MASS. 



LAWRENCE, MASS. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



WORCESTER, MASS. 



BRANCH OFFICES 

51 Franklin Street 
Telephone: OSborne 2-7762 
District Immigration Agent 
Daniel J. Donahue 

Room 308-30^ Blakeley Building 
477 Essex Street 
Telephone: MUrdock 2-2877 
District Immigration Agent 
Andrew W. Ansara 

State Office Building 
235 Chestnut Street 
Telephone: REpublic 4-1018 
District Immigration Agent 
John A. Mclnnes 

714 Powers Building 
74 Front Street 
Telephone: PLeasant 5-6815 
District Immigration Agent 
Edmund B. Meduski 



PUBLICATION No. 270 AFPRCVED BY ALFRED C. HOLLAND, STATE PURCHASING AGENT 



REPORT OF THE 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 
FOR THE YEAR JULY 1, 1965 TO JUNE 30, 1966 

This year brings to a close the forty-ninth year of service the Division 
of Immigration and Americanization has been rendering in the Commonwealth. 
Originally established in 1917 as The Bureau of Immigration, it became the 
Division of Immigration and Americanization in 1919 as part of the Department 
of Education when the Massachusetts Convention established the number of de- 
partments now operating in the Commonwealth. 

From 1917 to 1934, the Division had a Board and an unpaid Director dir- 
ecting the work of the office. In the interim, 1934 to 1939, two paid direc- 
tors had been in charge and when the Director resigned in 1939, no other was 
named. Chapter 409 of the Acts of 1939, regarding this Division was enacted 
as keeping the same duties and functions of the Division as previously, but 
eliminated the title of Director - as follows: 



CHAPTER 409 
ACTS OF 1939 



Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 



SECTION 1. The name of the advisory board of immigration and Americani- 
zation in the division of immigration and Americanization in the department 
of education is hereby changed to the board of immigration and Americaniza- 
tion. After the effective date of this act, said board, under its new name, 
and the division of immigration and Americanization in said department, shall 
continue as theretofore constituted, except as otherwise provided in this act, 

SECTION 2. Chapter fifteen of the General laws is hereby amended by 
striking out section four, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, and in- 
serting in place thereof the following: — Section 4. The commissioner shall 
be the executive and administrative head of the department. He shall have 
charge of the administration and enforcement of all laws, rules and regula- 
tions which it is th<2 dutv of the department to administer and enforce, and 
shall be chairman of the board. He shall organize in the department a divi- 
sion of public libraries, a division of immigration and Americanization, a 
division of the blind and such other divisions as he may determine. Each 
division, except the division of immigration and Americanization shall be in 
charge of a director, and each division shall be under the general supervisi- 
on of the commissioner. Nothing in this chapter shall be construed as affec- 
ting the powers and duties of the trustees of the Massachusetts state college 
as set forth in chapter seventy-five. 

SECTION 3. Said chapter fifteen is hereby further amended by striking 
out section twelve, as amended by chapter three hundred and sixty-seven of 
the acts of nineteen hundred and thirty five, and inserting in place thereof 
the following: — Section 12. The division of immigration and Americanization 
shall consist of a board of six persons to be known as the board of immigra- 
tion and Americanization. Two members of said board shall be appointed 



annually for three years each, by the governor, with the advice and consent 
of the council* The governor shall designate one of said members as chair- 
man. Said board shall meet at least once a month at such times as it may by 
rule determine, and when requested by any member thereof. The members of 
said board shall receive no compensation for their services, but shall be 
reimbursed for their actual necessary expenses incurred in the performance of 
their duties* 

SECTION 4. Chapter sixty -nine of the General laws is hereby amended by 
striking out section eleven, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition and 
inserting in place thereof the following: — Section 11. The division of immi- 
gration and Americanization shall employ such methods, consistent with law, 
as in its judgment, will tend bo bring into sympathetic and mutually helpful 
relations, t he Commonwealth and its residents of foreign origin, protect 
immigrants from exploitations and abuse, stimulate their acquisition and 
mastery of English, develop their understanding of American government, in- 
stitutions and ideals, and generally promote their assimilation and natura- 
lization. For the above purposes, the division may cooperate with other 
officers and departments of the commonwealth and with all public agencies, 
federal, state or municipal. It may investigate the exploitation or abuse 
of immigrants and in making any investigation may require the attendance and 
testimony of witnesses and the production of books and documents relating to 
the matter under investigation. Subject to the approval of the department 
and the commission on administration and finance, the division may make 
reasonable charges for any service rendered or material furnished by it, 

SECTION 5, This act shall take effect on December first in the current 
year. 

Approved August 3, 1939 

With the enactment of Chapter 572 June 28, 1965 following the report of 
the study of the Department of Education, the Division of Immigration and 
Americanization is now under the jurisdiction of the Board of Higher Educa- 
tion, as excerpts of the law show: 

SECTION 1, There shall be a department of education, in this chapter 
called the department, which shall be under the supervision and control of a 
board of education, 

SECTION 1A, There shall be in the department, but not subject to its 
control, a board of higher education, in this section and in sections one B, 
one C and one D called the board, consisting of a member of the board of 
trustees of the University of Massachusetts selected by majority vote of all 
the members of said board, a member of the board of trustees of state col- 
leges selected by a majority vote of all the members of said board, a member 
of the board of regional community colleges selected by majority vote of all 
its members, and a member of the board of trustees of Lowell Technological 
Institute or cf the board of trustees for the Southeastern Massachusetts 
Technological Institute selected alternately by majority vote of all the 
members of said respective board, each of said four members to serve for a 
term of one year, and seven persons to be appointed by the governor, one of 
whom shall be a member of the governing board of a private institution of 
higher education in the commonwealth, one of whom shall be a member of a 
labor organization affiliated with the Massachusetts State Labor Council 
AFL-CIO and at least two of whom shall fee women, etc, 

- 2 - 



SECTION ID. The board shall take cognizance of the problems of immigra- 
tion and Americanization within the commonwealth and provide a program ade- 
quate to meet the needs of such problems. 

SECTION 39. The board of collegiate authority, the advisory board of 
higher education policy, the board of immigration and Americanization, the 
board of educational assistance, and the medical, dental and nursing scholar- 
ship board are hereby abolished, and the terms of all members of said boards 
are hereby terminated. 

SERVICES RENDERED 

The charts attached will show the 46,162 services rendered last year in 
the five offices of the Division, an increase of 3,500 over last year reflec- 
ting the innovation of the new immigration law affecting so many applicants. 
The notable increase is marked in the number of petitions made by the close 
relatives now that preference status has made possible reunions of alien 
resident parents with adult unmarried children, alien spouses now classified 
in second preference category and also the availability of additional quota 
numbers from the pool have encouraged persons to petition for brothers and 
sisters for whom there had been many years wait. Now, under the new law, it 
has made it imperative for relatives to make such petitions in order not to 
be subject to labor clearance requirements. The year 1966 shows that we 
filled 1,604 petitions for relatives as compared to 785 of the past year. 
9,309 inquiries for information regarding immigration laws and procedures 
show the interest in this field as compared to 7,851 last year. 

The Boston office recorded 24,917 services; Fall River, 2,885; Lawrence, 
6,541; Springfield, 4,055; and Worcester, 5,756 - each office showing an 
increase over last year. 

The charts attached show the many types of services given which include 
every phase of assimilation of the many foreign born persons in the Common- 
wealth. Not only assistance in reunion of families or adjustment of status 
for aliens ,or the various phases of citizenship and naturalization, but in- 
cludes current needs as proving age for medicare and social security, by 
helping persons to get copies of lost Naturalization certificate or cartifi- 
cates of Derivative Citizenship in their desire to vote or travel abroad. 
The detailed explanation of the services are many and numerous and attests 
to a dedicated personnel. 

NATIONALITY AND ETHNIC BACKGROUND 

The following list records the larger groups of nationalities of our 
clients: 



Italy 


7,535 


Portugal 


4,850 


Canada 


4,216 


United States born 


3,934 


Cuba 


3,739 



- 3 - 



Greece 3,128 

Poland 2,611 

Ireland 1,648 

China 1,317 

Germany 1 , 260 

England 1,047 

Jamaica 704 

Lebanon 607 

Trinidad 480 

France 430 

Colombia 425 

U.S.S.R. 381 

Barbados 329 

Lithuania 328 

Philippines 326 - etc. 

Every city and town of the Commonwealth, I believe, is listed as residences 
of our applicants* 

NEW ARRIVALS IN MASSACHUSETTS 

Between 1956 and 1965 (the latest available Federal report), a total of 
116,283 new immigrants came to Massachusetts: 



1956 


11; 


,742 




1957 


11 j 


,260 




1958 


10, 


,128 




1959 


°; 


,855 




1960 


11) 


,953 




1961 


12, 


,091 




1962 


11) 


,578 




1963 


13, 


,571 




1964 


12, 


,650 




1965 


11, 


,455 




;h of the 11,455 


admitted 


were: 


Canada 






3,367 


United Kingdom 






1,496 


Ireland 






717 


Germany 






670 


Italy 






593 


Poland 






474 


Cuba 






342 


Denmark, Norway 


& Sweden 


249 


Greece 






221 


China 






152 


U.S.S.R. 






90 


Japan 






53 


Mexico 






33 


Yugoslavia 






33 


Philippines 






25 


All Other 






1,869 


TOTAL 






11,455 



- 4 - 



We send a letter of welcome to each family and last year we sent 9,094 
such letters to the newly arrived immigrants offering our services and giv- 
ing vital information regarding requirements of address change notification, 
classes to attend, inquiries regarding vaccinations for children, evaluation 
of education proof from abroad, as well as procedures regarding reunions of 
families. 

Years ago, before World War II, when Boston was the regular port of 
arrival for immigrants from Europe and ships came regularly, our social 
workers went to the piers to assist the immigrant passengers in interpreta- 
tion, custom procedures and being assisted to transportation, facilities 
enroute to relatives in Massachusetts. Now, most of the immigrants arrive 
in Boston by air and sufficient personnel could never be provided to meet 
all and the need is not there. However, the SS Batory with some 800 Polish 
immigrants landed in Boston in December and three of our personnel, with 
knowledge of the language, met and assisted many of the passengers coming to 
join their relatives in Massachusetts. 

ALIENS IN MASSACHUSETTS 

The United states report of aliens reporting in the United States to 
the total of 3,482,553 records 135,417 for Massachusetts - an increase of 
some 2,500 over last year and next year it is predicted with the enactment 
of the new immigration law, more immigrants will emigrate to Massachusetts. 
The countries of birth noted in the 1966 address report are: 

Canada 



34,985 

Italy 13,879 

United Kingdom il',279 

Poland 8,870 

Ireland 6,474 

Germany 5,129 

U.S.S.R. 2,221 

Cuba 1,583 

Netherlands 1,417 

Japan 470 

Mexico 211 

Philippines 194 

All Other Permanent 36,980 

Other Than Permanent 11,725 

TOTAL 135,417 



In the Federal report it is noted that almost 75 per cent of the per- 
manent resident aliens are living in the following eight states: 



California 


795,187 - 26% 


New York 


561,240 - 18% 


Texas 


230,838 - 8% 


Illinois 


189,748 - 6% 


New Jersey 


159,109 - 5% 


Michigan 


125,624 - 4% 


Massachusetts 


123,692 - 4% 


Florida 


104,277 - 3% 



- 5 - 



As the last census records, it is noted that 40% of persons in Massa- 
chusetts are of "foreign stock." Foreign stock is defined by the Census 
Bureau as those of foreign birth and natives of foreign or mixed foreign and 
native parentage. The Federal report notes a proportionate increase in alien 
population from Central and South America and this has been noted in our work 
also. The Cuban and Dominican situations have greatly influenced the .' 
increase in alien population from these countries. 

CUBANS 

In 1966, the record shows about 255,000 Cubans in the United States. In 
Massachusetts, the official alien registration lists them as 1,583 but all 
estimates by various social agencies list this number higher due to their 
frequent mobility from one state to another. 

Our services to the Cubans continue in their adjustment to life in the 
United states. For the many for whom we had initiated application to change 
to permanent residents by application at the United States Consulate in 
Canada, notably Montreal, this year has already caused many disappointments. 
In enactment of Public Law 89-236, notice was sent Cubans whose applications 
were pending on the administrative waiting list, many since 1964, that the 
new law required labor clearances. This order was rescinded for the great 
number of persons applying for immigrant visas. Some 100 cases were returned 
to us with new instructions to initiate applications for immigrant visas now 
at the Consulate at St. John, New Brunswick, Canada. Also, the following 
requisites had to be met: 

(1) a copy of the applicant's birth certificate 

(2) a letter, statement or affidavit given by a federal, 
state, county, municipal or other official acting in 
his official capacity showing that the applicant is 
a member of a profession or occupation for which a 
license or permit will be required in order to enable 
him to pursue his profession or occupation 

(3) a letter from the applicant in which he explains the 
need for an immigrant visa, including a statement 
about the hardship which he believes exists in his 
case or if he has a legally resident or citizen 
spouse or child. 

Many in professional standing as several architects, teachers, engineers, 
radio technicians, etc., were able to show the need requiring permanent resi- 
dence - the need of Declaration of Intention required for license issuance. 
Others had resident spouses or citizen spouses and a number had American born 
children so that the new applications were accepted at the Consul in St. John, 
New Brunswick, Canada. Procedures continue of initial application, transla- 
tion of pertinent documents, assistance in obtaining necessary police clear- 
ances and filling the several sets of forms required at the Consulate for the 
applicant when finally an appointment is given after months of procedures, 
medical appointments are arranged at a local hospital and "form 512" in lieu 
of passport is requested from the United States Immigration authorities 
before the trip to Canada. 



- 6 - 



Many feel disappointed that their applications have not been accepted by 
the Consul now for action because of the lack of need for employment, compas- 
sionate circumstances or the lack of required "resident spouse, parents or 
child." 

Even when informed that it is hoped that automatic adjustment for Cubans 
seems imminent because the immigration committees have several bills under 
consideration, the retort is, "This action has been predicted for the past 
four years, I wish I could make it now for sure I" 

The Cubans in Massachusetts seem to be resident in many areas and tend 
not to stay in isolated groups. The largest group is in Boston with Lawrence 
and Lowell reporting large colonies. Already some will be eligible for citi- 
zenship as we noted the earlier departures of some were via Jamaica and 
Mexico and now with five years of residence under "permanent status" they are 
ready to apply for United states Citizenship. 

OUR WESTERN HEMISPHERE NEIGHBORS 

With the increase in the past few years of immigrants from Honduras, 
South America and Central America, it has been natural to show increase in 
the services for persons of these areas. Up to December, 1965 when the new 
law P.L. 89-236 became effective, many of the persons who had come to the 
United States in temporary status were able to change to permanent residence 
and we assisted many in this category, as after their temporary stay in the 
United States they had decided to get work and stay in the United States. 
Among them were office workers, engineers, as well as domestics. 

Since this is no longer possible to do, we have given information and 
forms ES-575 A and B with instructions for initiation of labor clearance and 
return to their homeland to wait possible action and return to the United 
States on permanent visa as residents. 

We note also the increase of our clients bringing relatives from Trini- 
dad and Jamaica now nonquota. Even though the labor clearance requirement 
has been a hindrance in many cases, many others have benefited because of 
relationship or occupation and the statistics next year should show a notable 
increase in this area. 

THE NEW IMMIGRATION LAW 

On October 3, 1965, President Johnson signed into law an immigration 
bill which made important changes in the basic immigration law of the United 
States. These changes relate primarily to the selection of immigrants who 
may enter the United States. Hailed as the law against racial discrimination, 
it protects the American labor market from an influx of both skilled and un- 
skilled foreign labor. The National Origins Quota System is to be eventually 
abolished as provided beginning July 1, 1968. 

- 7 - 



For the past 45 years, every country outside the Western Hemisphere has 
been assigned an annual "quota" -- the number of immigrants born in that 
country who could immigrate to the United States. The only exception was 
certain "nonquota" relatives of American citizens. This system was known as 
the "national origins quota system." Under it, many countries had quotas of 
only a few hundred, while several countries had large quotas, only a small 
part of which they used. Frequently the unused quotas were as much as 60,000 
a year out of an annual total of 158,561 for all countries. Our quota system 
was based on the formula of 1/6 of 1 per cent of the foreign white population 
as recorded in the 1920 census. 

Under the new law, this national origins quota system will be abolished 
on June 30, 1968. Until then, the unused quotas in any immigration year — 
July 1 to June 30 -- will form an immigration pool. The visas in this immi- 
gration pool will be available to immigrants who are entitled to a preference 
but who have not been able to obtain a visa because their quota was over- 
subscribed. 



IMMEDIATE RELATIVES NOT LIMITED 

Under the new law a limit of 170,000 will be set on the number of immi- 
grants who may come to the United States in any year from countries outside 
the Western Hemisphere. This limitation will not apply, however, to the 
"immediate relatives" of American citizens, that is: the spouse or unmarried 
children under 21 of any American citizen and the parents of any American 
citizen who is over 21. 

The following categories are prescribed by law: 

First preference (unmarried sons and daughters of U. S. citizens): not to 
exceed 20% of the over-all limitation of 170,000 in any fiscal year or 
34,000; 

Second preference (spouses and unmarried sons and daughters of aliens lawfully 
admitted for permanent residence): not to exceed 20% of the over-all limi- 
tation plus numbers not required for first preference - 34,000; 

Third preference (members of the professions or persons of exceptional ability 
in the sciences and arts): not to exceed 10% of the over-all limitation 
with no provision for taking from other preferences - 17,000; 

Fourth preference (married sons or daughters of U.S. citizens): not to exceed 
10% of the over-all limitation plus any numbers not required by the first 
three preference categories - at least 17,000; 

Fifth preference (brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens): not to exceed 24% 
of the over -all limitation plus any numbers not required by the first four 
preference categories - at least 40,800; 

Sixth preference (skilled or unskilled workers in short supply): not to 
exceed 10% of the over-all limitation with no provision for taking from 
other preferences - 17,000; 

Seventh preference (refugees): not to exceed 6% of the over-all limitation 
with no provision for taking from other preferences - 10,200; 

Nonpreference (other immigrants): numbers not used by the seven preference 
categories. 

- 8 - 



One new law was eagerly awaited by many relatives, as the alien spouse 
who had herself come to the United States a few years ago accompanying her 
parents to the United States and then a minor. Her father had waited many 
years for his turn in the quota. This young Italian girl returned to visit 
Italy and married her girlhood sweetheart and as the beneficiary of her 
petition, in the third preference category, and because of the many appli- 
cants before him, the separation of two years now ended because his prefer- 
ence status now made possible a quota number for him. Affected were many 
parents of United states citizens whose petitions were approved. Greek, 
Turkish, Portuguese and Chinese born parents who became "nonquota" benefited. 
New affidavits of support were required by many and many have already arrived 
under this law. 



REGARDING WESTERN HEMISPHERE NEIGHBORS 

Beginning July 1, 1968, a limit of 120,000 a year will be placed on 
immigrants who are natives of Western Hemisphere countries. Again, this 
limitation will not apply to the "immediate relatives" of American citizens; 
that is, the spouse and unmarried child under 21 of a United States citizen 
or the parent of a citizen. within each of these respective limits, or ceil- 
ings, selection will be made without regard to an applicant's birthplace or 
nationality. Outside the western Hemisphere, visas will be issued according 
to a system of preferences established by the new law on a "first-come "first- 
served" basis. Not more than 20,000 immigration visas may be issued to the 
natives of any one country in any year. Within the Western Hemisphere visas 
will be granted on a "first-come first-served" basis with no limitation on 
the number from any one Western Hemisphere country. 

LABOR CERTIFICATIONS 

No worker without immediate relatives can come to the United States 
unless he has a certificate from the Department of Labor. It must be shown 
that there are not sufficient workers at his area of destination to perform 
the type of work he will engage in and also that his employment will not 
adversely affect wages and working conditions of workers similarly employed. 

Discrimination is caused by the requirement for a labor certification 
in all cases except where there are close relatives, i.e. for persons outside 
of the Western Hemisphere no labor certification is required for spouses and 
children of American citizens and legal residents and parents, sisters and 
brothers of American citizens. However, for Western Hemisphere natives, a 
labor certificate is required for all except spouses, children and parents of 
American citizens or legal residents. Thus, adult sons and daughters, . . ' 
married children and sisters and brothers of American citizens, who are 
natives of the Western Hemisphere, must obtain labor certifications, whereas 
their counterparts in other parts of the world are not required to do so. A 
United States citizen brother or sister making a petition for such a relative 
excludes his relatives from the Labor Certification which many of our appli- 
cants have found hard to overcome, especially for relatives in "unskilled 
work." 



- 9 - 



The Labor Department Regulations contain a list of unskilled or semi- 
skilled occupations which are not in short supply and for which it would be 
useless to apply for a labor certification (Schedule B). For practically 
all others, except the very old and young and students, the labor certifica- 
tion is required. An examination of Schedule B will show that many of the 
isiaigrafcts in the past were the ones who filled such jobs. 

Categories of workers for which a certificate of Section 212(a) (14) can- 
not now be made: 

" Schedule B 
Occupational Titles 

Attendants, Parking Lot 

Attendants (Service Workers such as Personal Service Attendants, 

Amusement and Recreation Service Attendants) 
Automobile Service Station Attendants 
Bakers* Helpers 
Bartenders 

Bookkeepers II * * II refers to dictionary of 

Bus Boys professional titles from which 

Carpenters 1 Helpers job description is taken 

Cashiers II * 

Chauffeurs and Taxicab Drivers 
Charwomen and Cleaners 
Clerks (general office) 
Clerks, Hotel 

Clerks and Checkers, Grocery Store 
Cook»s Helpers 

Counter and Fountain Workers 
Domestic Day Workers 
Electric Truck Operators 
Elevator Operators 
Fishermen and Oystermen 
Floor Man, Floor Boy and Floor Girl 
Groundskeepers 
Guards and Watchmen 
Housekeepers 
Housemen and Yardmen 
janitors 

Kitchen Workers and Helpers 
Laborers , Farm 
Laborers, Mine 
Laborers, Common 

Launderers, Cleaners, Dyers and Pressers 
Library Assistants 
Loopers and Toppers, Textile 
Maids, Hotel 
Material Handlers 
Packers, Markers, Bottlers, and related 



- 10 - 



Painters 1 Helpers 

Routeman Helpers 

Sailors and Deck Hands 

Sales Clerk, General 

Sewing Machine Operators and Hand Stitchers 

Street Railway and Bus Conductors 

Telephone Operators 

Truck Drivers and Tractor Drivers 

Truck Driver's Helpers 

Typists, lesser skilled 

Ushers, Recreation and Amusement 

Waiters and Waitresses 

Warehousemen 

Welder's Helpers 

Many of our applicants have been successful in getting domestic place- 
ments for relatives notably from Ireland, England, Jamaica and Trinidad. Some 
are making efforts for sixth preference category as an uncle with Italian 
born nephews who have been on the list awaiting their turn in the nonprefer- 
ence category since 1949i I One is an experienced bricklayer and the other a 
landscape expert. We have assisted in translating the documents to prove the 
education and experience of several such persons which had to filed with the 
application after labor certification. 

The happier notes under the new law have seen reunions of those rela- 
tives who have been waiting many years to come and almost all countries had 
current quota status except in Italy where brothers and sisters registered 
prior to January 1, 1955 are still waiting to come to the United States. 

This law involving Immigration and Naturalization Service, Department of 
State and Department of Labor regulations is far-reaching and already changes 
in regulations have been proposed. Many of our clients are affected. It 
made possible for many of the Hong Kong refugees in this area to change to 
permanent residents as they were beneficiaries of petitions of parents, 
sisters and brothers of United States citizens. However, the labor clearance 
requirement for many relatives coming from the Western Hemisphere is working 
a hardship in many instances. 

NA TURAL I ZATION ASSISTANCE 

From 1956 through June 30, 1965, 54,807 persons were naturalized in 
Massachusetts. Of the 4,652 persons who were sworn in as citizens ending 
June 30, 1965, their countries of birth are: 

Canada 675 

Italy 663 

Ireland 459 

United Kingdom 355 

Germany 339 

Greece 266 

Poland 186 



- 11 - 



China 


141 


Hungary 


83 


Japan 


57 


U.S.S.R. 


44 


Cuba 


39 


Norway, Sweden & Denmark 


38 


Philippines 


31 


Yugoslavia 


13 


Mexico 


6 


All Other 


1,257 


TOTAL 


4,652 



2,151 applications for such naturalization were made for persons whom we 
assisted in filling the forms. To each one we give our booklet "Questions 
and Answers in Preparation for the Naturalization Examination-,'; We distri-. 
bute this booklet to teachers of Citizenship classes and Civic groups yearly 
to total about 10,000 booklets. 

The incentive to become an "American" varies. With some it is to get 
the Defense factory job, with others so they can petition to bring their 
mother, brother or sister to the United States, but basically for all it is 
the sense of feeling to "really belong to the r best country' in the world" 
as expressed by several of the applicants who had applied for citizenship 
after the visit "home" after living in the United States for some years. 

Language barriers must be overcome and reading and writing in English is 
still a block for a number of persons in initiating their applications with 
us. Encouragement in further study and application and attendance at evening 
school classes has brought happy conclusions. 

There are still elderly persons anxious to be citizens but have not had 
the opportunity of becoming proficient in reading and writing English. It 
would help a number of our clients if the requirements of the Act of December 
1952 were amended to give the privilege of being naturalized without passing 
the reading and writing test after 20 years residence and age 50 instead of 
requiring that the person so applying should have been 50 years of age and 
had 20 years residence on December 24, 1952, 

A number of Philippine born servicemen, spouse of citizens, were able to 
be naturalized after we had arranged for them to get immigrant visas at near- 
by consuls in Canada. This was required because these men who had enlisted 
in the Philippines just for service in the U. S. Armed Forces, would have 
been required to depart from the United States at the termination of Service. 
All had more than six years of Service. By assisting their spouse in the 
necessary petitions of issuance of immigration visas to put them in the non- 
quota status, and then by much correspondence with the Consul and assembling 
and transmitting the necessary documents, appointments are arranged and the 
veteran serviceman went to Canada for his visa and becam« a "legal resident." 



- 12 - 



Then because of his three years service in the Armed Forces, he was able to 
be naturalized in a few months time. 

Under the new law which provides preference category for certain service- 
men, we have initiated applications for several such Philippine born men. A 
quota number should be available to them in this category and an appointment 
possible to arrange at the Consulate in Canada. On return, they may apply and 
be naturalized as United States Citizens. 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 

The work of the Division receives no paid publicity and the clients are 
referred by organizations or by others whom we have assisted. The interest 
in the new laws caused the invitations to our several agents to speak on the 
radio about the law and the work of the office. The Division has good working 
relations with the many social agencies in their areas of the offices to the 
mutual benefit of each. We are glad to be of assistance as information con- 
sultants regarding citizenship and the many immigration procedures and laws 
and the continuous stream of clients requiring our services is an attestation 
to the requirements of the "foreign born population of the Commonwealth" in 
assimilation in the State of Massachusetts making for a happier and mutually 
beneficial atmosphere for all. 

PREDICTIONS IN THE FUTURE 

Already there have been many changes in the immigration and naturaliza- 
tion laws proposed. The discriminations in the present law of permitting 
relatives of citizens who are able to petition for relatives and make them not 
require the labor clearance and making it compulsory for such relatives coming 
from our neighboring Western Hemisphere countries, needs further considera-" 
tion. Already it has been felt of the few immigrants now being admitted from 
Canada, Central and South America. The proposed quota of 120,000 for the 
countries of the Western Hemisphere which is scheduled to be effective July 1, 
1968, is being further considered by tJtm Committees. Many naturalization pro- 
visions have been suggested for change and the ever changing world conditions 
will always effect the policies of our country and our state. The days of 
unlimited immigration are past, but the involvement of our nation and its 
ideals of Americanism will make us always heed the need of the refugees of the 
world. Last - now much in consideration - are the refugees of Vietnam. Will 
the Golden Door be open, as in the words of Emma Lazarus which adorn the 
Statue of Liberty: 

"Give me your tired, your poor, 
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, 
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. 
Send these, the homeless, tempest -tossed to me: 
I lift my lamp beside the golden door." 

The services of our offices not only benefits individuals, but makes for 
better communities by assisting the persons of foreign background to become a 
part of the community, state and country by voting and participation in civic 
affairs and instills appreciation of the AMERICAN way of life. 

- 13 - 



REPORTS OF DISTRICT AGENTS 



SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 



With the close of the fiscal year on June 30, 1966, our statistics show 
that 4,055 services were performed for individuals residing in the four 
Western Counties of our Commonwealth which come under the jurisdiction of the 
Springfield Office. 

Individuals came to us from 46 localities in our area and we had contact 
with 53 former residents now residing elsewhere in the United States, Persons 
assisted came from 69 different countries with natives of the United States 
leading the group. Persons born in Canada, Italy, Poland, Jamaica, Germany, 
Greece, England, Ireland and Portugal made up the major nationalities. 

Upon receipt of names of newly arrived immigrants destined to our part 
of the state, furnished us by the United States Immigration Service, letters 
were sent to them welcoming them and offering to them our many services found 
helpful to adjust to their new way of life. This past year letters were sent 
to 830 families. 

As expected, the bulk of our work came under the heading of Immigration. 
The amended Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 effective December 1, . 
1965, although it brought relief to many and aided in the joining of immed- 
iate relatives, it also created a major problem for many who in the past en- 
countered no great difficulty in obtaining immigrant visas. The so-called 
special immigrants of independent countries of the Western Hemisphere, 
natives of Great Britain and Ireland, not qualified for preference visas, 
witnessed difficulties trying to obtain "Labor Department Clearance" because 
this class of immigrants must show that he has employment waiting for him 
upon his arrival in the United States which has been approved by the United 
States Department of Labor. Our experience has been that many, many people 
are required to seek employment for their relatives and have difficulty in 
finding an employer willing to execute the required Application ES-575-B. 
The majority of people have informed us that, verbally, they have been told 
by an employer that favorable consideration may be given to hiring a person 
after he or she has come to the United States. Employers seem to be reluc- 
tant to execute the above-mentioned applications especially if the individu- 
als seeking to come to the United States are not highly skilled. 

This particular requirement of the law caused us to have some very try- 
ing moments and we were the recipients of unpleasant emotions of people who 
were disappointed and ired because they believe the so-called Immigration Law 
was liberalized to permit anyone to enter the United States. It was suggest- 
ed to these people that they register their objections with their particular 
member of Congress. It was rewarding to see the fruits of our labors with 
the arrival of persons from Greece, Italy and Portugal who benefited by the 
change of the law. The majority of these people had been registered on con- 
sular lists for fifteen years. We had correspondence in their behalf with 
the United States Consular Offices to request validation of visa petitions 
and subsequently prepared the required affidavit of support. 



- 14 - 



During the period of registration for MEDICARE, we were called upon to 
assist many people in trying to obtain proof that their aged relatives were 
lawful permanent residents. Many of these were elderly people who were con- 
fined to institutions or nursing homes and very forgetful and unable to fur- 
nish definite facts about entry to this country. Due to our training and 
experience, we believe that we were most helpful. 

Some of our naturalization cases, as well as travel cases, involved de- 
pendents of the Armed Forces - most of them wives of members of the Air Force 
in Vietnam or others serving in isolated areas where dependents are not per- 
mitted to travel. 

One case of interest, we believe, concerns an alien gentleman, 86 years 
of age, a widower and a resident of the United States for 60 years, who came 
to us in reference to obtaining a document which would enable him to visit 
the country of his birth (and reenter the United States without difficulty) 
and to obtain information about bringing his bride to the United States . ■'. ..-.. 
should he be fortunate enough to acquire one while abroad. As things deve- 
loped in this case, it was discovered there was no record of his lawful ad-: 
mission. Therefore, he was made to apply to have a record of his entry 
created. It is hoped that at this time of his life he will be blessed with 
a good wife and, as he has stated, with good old-country cooking. 

We have contacts with, and receive cooperation from, public and private 
agencies involving social work and continue to receive full and excellent 
cooperation from the Staff of the local Immigration and Naturalization 
Service, as well as from the District Office at Boston, We had numerous con- 
tacts with the Americanization Supervisors and teachers and furnished them 
with our booklets for use in their classes for individuals preparing for the 
naturalization examination. 



LAWRENCE OFFICE 

The Lawrence Branch Office ended the fiscal year, having served the 
greatest number of persons in the history of the office. This, without ques- 
tion, is due to two factors: First, the amendments to the Immigration Law, 
which, on one hand permitted nary persens to join their relatives in the 
United States after many years of separation, while on the other hand, com- 
plicated the entry into the United States of individuals from a number of 
countries, chiefly Canada, due to strict labor restrictions. The second 
factor was the release by the Castro government in Cuba of thousands of per- 
sons wishing to join refugee relatives in the United States. 

Publicity undoubtedly played a large part in the increase of services 
rendered by this office. In January, the Lawrence and Lowell newspapers and 
radio stations gave extensive coverage to the Alien Registration Program's 
address reporting. They emphasized our readiness to assist aliens in comple- 
ting the cards. In February, this Agent was interviewed over Lowell Radio 
W*CA*P on a one -half hour program, "Education In Review," In March this 
Agent spoke to representatives of the Massachusetts Division of Employment 



- 15 - 



Security in Lowell and to District Managers meeting in Haverhill, discussing 
labor clearance procedures for intending immigrants* In April, this Agent 
met with representatives of the Lawrence Office of the Social Security Admin- 
istration where we discussed various methods to prove entry into the United 
States for elderly aliens applying for Medicare. The Lowell and Lawrence 
newspapers have also been extremely cooperative in publicizing various as- 
pects of our work. 

The chief service rendered by the Lawrence office during the last fiscal 
year dealt with immigration. Visa petitions and affidavits of support for 
relatives abroad kept us especially busy during the year. The second largest 
service rendered pertained to citizenship. There was a sharp increase in the 
number of persons applying for naturalization over the previous year. This 
Agent attended the naturalization sessions in Lawrence and in Lowell, At 
each session, the Naturalization Examiner advised the new citizens of the 
functions of our office. At one naturalization session in Lawrence, the ap- 
plications of all who were sworn in to United States Citizenship were pre- 
pared by this office. 

Other services given by the Lawrence Office last year were the transla- 
tion of documents from Italian, Arabic, French and German, the assistance to 
United States citizens in the completion of applications for United States 
passports and the assistance to prospective employers in the completion of 
labor clearance applications. We also sent letters of welcome to all new 
arrivals in this area and referred newcomers with problems other than immi- 
gration or citizenship to the proper resources. This past year, an espec- 
ially large amount of correspondence was conducted between this office and 
American Consuls abroad on behalf of our clients. 

We are continuing to maintain excellent relations with public and pri- 
vate agencies both in the United States and abroad, and are receiving their 
full cooperation for our clients, 

WORCESTER OFFICE 

As the Chinese people designate certain years, we can call Nineteen- 
sixty-five the year of Public Lav; 89-235, the Naw Immigration Law, The first 
part of the year was spent explaining the pending legislation and possible 
ramifications, and the latter part completing forms for persons who were 
benefiting from the new regulations, as explaining at length Form ES-575, 
"Application for Alien Employment Certification ", which is a boon for cer- 
tain skilled immigrants and a bugaboo for many other prospective immigrants. 
This accounts for contact with 3,488 clients and resulting 5,756 services. 

In the performance of our duties, information giving concerning immigra- 
tion, citizenship or travel may only take a few minutes or it could involve 
a good part of an hour. Regardless of our volume of activity, we frown on 
"cutting an applicant short" during an interview, as some of our applicants 
mentioned that it has happened to them in some offices, and most of us had 
the same experience at one time or another. 



- 16 - 



To cite a few of our lengthier cases; In June, a married college student 
from Bermuda, the father of a child born here, entered the country after ob- 
taining a permanent visa at the U, S, Consulate General, Montreal, Canada* 
His case was started last year and there are 44 pages in his folder consisting 
of copies of forms, correspondence with the Consulate General, the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service and other pertinent services. As his representa- 
tive, I had to request five extensions of stay for him. J 

Another complicated visa application by a young man from Cuba involved 
immigration and citizenship technicalities, some 25 letters are in the case 
folder. There was a question of derivative citizenship, but it was establi- 
shed finally that his father did not have sufficient residence in the United 
States before the son's birth in Cuba* 

In December, the Agent had a unique and hectic experience in meeting the 
S. S, Batory at Commonwealth Pier, Boston when it arrived from Poland with 
some 800 Polish Immigrants, The Agent was assigned this duty and accompanied 
by the Supervisor of Social Service and another worker from the Boston Office, 
a Polish speaking Social Worker to this duty of assisting the immigrants, 
helping in processing and examination at Customs, in uniting them with wait- 
ing relatives, as well as assisting many to get started to their destination 
by exchanging prepaid tickets with representatives of the various facilities 
on the pier. Incidentally, several of the persons I assisted were relatives 
of my Worcester clients. 

In this area served by the Worcester Office, we have many calls for 
advice and assistance for traveling abroad* During the year, several churches 
and ethnic groups conducted tours. Before the trip, we advise them concerning 
requirements for a United States passport, smallpox shots, etc. Income tax 
clearance for aliens is a requirement and needs clarifying. 

In some cases there is the problem of rushing through derivative applica- 
tions of citizenship. After the trip, we listened to stories about pathetic 
conditions in the villages and answering questions concerning relative peti- 
tions and employment certification because the travelers wish to sponsor the 
people they visited. Many express the feeling that the labor requirement is 
cruel and the previous wait for a nonpr^ference number was a preferable situa- 
tion even if it entailed a five to ten year period. 

The Agent attended three evening Ecumenical Services for Christian Unity 
held in Worcester at Saint Paul's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Saint Spyridon's 
Greek Orthodox Church, Chestnut Street Congregational Church, as well as many 
Social Service organization functions. Cooperation with many social agencies 
is mutually beneficial. 

This office has received an information statement from the Worcester Re- 
development Authority concerning relocation benefits and moving expenses, 
because we are located in the planned center complex. It is not an eviction 
notice, but a few tenants in the area have already relocated. There has been 
talk of a new State Office Building for Worcester, although no official notice 
was ever given. It would appear that this office will have to relocate else- 
where soon, 

- 17 - 



FALL RIVER OFFICE 

The fiscal year closed on June 30, 1966 with the Fall River Office record- 
ing a total of 4,885 services rendered to persons residing in the southeastern 
Massachusetts Area. These clients came from thirty-eight separate communities 
and a total of 2,184 individuals were served. The total of 4,885 was an in- 
crease in services amounting to 707 from the previous fiscal year. The ethnic 
background of these clients was made up of fifty-three nations. 

As usual, residents of the City of Fall River head the list of clients 
served in this office and the City of New Bedford ranks second. They are the 
fourth and fifth largest cities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
nationality makeup of persons given services are mainly Portuguese as shown 
in the Nationality Statistics in that 3,203 were of this ethnic origin. 

This District Agent continues visits to New Bedford one day a week and 
encounters a heavy work-load for that single day. 

While the applications for citizenship and immigration services are the 
bulk of our work, other services are just as important, such as: clients 
seeking information on citizenship, immigration, travel and newcomer problems; 
the writing of letters to local, state and federal agencies; also to State 
Department Foreign Service Offices throughout the world; the completion of 
applications for lost naturalization certificates; alien registration cards 
and assisting visitors and foreign students in their problems. 

With the enactment of Public Law 89,236, effective December 1, 1965, the 
work-load has increased immensely. Brothers and sisters of United States citi- 
zens who are now fifth preference on the quota are entering Southeastern Massa- 
chusetts in ever increasing numbers as evidenced by the fact that 1,657 new- 
comer slips were received at this office during this fiscal year* Newcomer 
letters have been sent to these newly arrived immigrants telling them of our 
services in the event they seek assistance. 

The second half of this fiscal year has been the busiest in the memory of 
this District Agent in the past twenty years as evidenced by the fact that 102 
Change of Status applications were completed at this office. 

The Southeastern Massachusetts area is now in the light of a broad and 
bright future in the field of education* The building of the Southeastern 
Massachusetts Technological Institute located in Dartmouth offers excellent 
opportunities for higher learning to the sons and daughters of these newcomers. 
It will also increase the influx of foreign students who will require services 
rendered by this office. 

This District Agent has appeared on radio programs such as WNBH of New 
Bedford on the orogram "Open Line" and on WALE of Fall River on the program 
♦'Sounding Board. " He spoke before the graduating class of the Adult Education 
Program in Fall River and the "I Am An American Day Club" dinner in Fall River, 

It is anticipated that thousands of new immigrants will locate in South- 
eastern Massachusetts in the next two or three years as evidenced by the back- 
log of fifth preference immigrants chargeable to the quota of Portugal. 

- 18 - 



2 
O 
H 
CO 

§ 

statist: 


:cal det; 


LAWRENCE 


> SPRING- 
£ FIELD 


K 

d} 
H 

& 

U 

a 

8 

Offices 


< 
H 
O 
H 


Servi 
FISCAL YEAR 7/1/65 - 6/30/66 


bes Giver 
2,224 


OFFICE 
2^,799 




INFORMATION 6,513 


2,461 


_3, 318 


17,315 


Booklets, forms, blanks 1 ? 191 


604 


94 


328 


324 


2,541 


Citizenship 418 


668 


533 


872 


818 


3,309 


Immigration 4 ? 402 


664 


1,789 


1,021 


1,433 


9,309 


Travel 98 


18 


271 


170 


739 


1,296 


Other 404 


270 


112 


70 


4 


860 


FORMS FILLED 5^660 


1,164 


1^523 


776 


1^104 


10,227 


AR-ll(Change of Address) 259 


25 


87 


80 


59 


510 


DSP70( Biographic Data) 85 


- 


25 


4 


3 


117 


FS-497(Visa Registration) 209 


2 


50 


15 


7 


283 


FS-510(Imm.Visa Application) 110 


- 


40 


1 


6 


157 


G-28(Representative Reg.) 190 


102 


20 


- 


20 


332 


I-53(Alien Registration) 507 


124 


557 


80 


243 


1,511 


I-90(Dupl.Alien Reg, Card) 282 


23 


49 


54 


50 


463 


I-130(Relative Petition) 1 ? 019 


210 


165 


73 


137 


1,604 


I-131(Reentry Permit) 154 


5 


12 


17 


28 


216 


I-140(Skilled Labor Petition) 26 


w* 


13 


- 


1 


40 


I-212(Per.to Reenter After Dep. ) 4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


I -243( Removal to Native Country) 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


I -256A( Suspension Deportation) 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


I -290B( Appeal) 3 


- 


- 


- 


2 


5 


I -484( Foreign Clearance) 24 


- 


5 


1 


1 


31 


I-485(Registry for Citizenship) 15 


- 


4 


2 


3 


24 


I-485(Status Adjustment) 301 


102 


35 


21 


19 


478 


I -506 (Temp. Change Status)" 37 


1 


- 


- 


5 


43 


I -539 (Extension Visitor Stay) 316 


139 


75 


42 


165 


737 


I-550(Verification Legal Arrival) 144 


1 


19 


4 


5 


173 


I-591(Refugee-Escapee Assurance) io 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


l-600(0rphan Application) 2 


- 


4 


- 


4 


10 


I-601{ Waiver) ft 


- 


•-> 


- 


- 


9 


I -612 (Exch. Student Waiver) 2 


- 


- 


„ 


1 


3 


Other Immigration Forms 79 


58 


90 


15 


40 


282 


N- 300 (Declaration of Intention) 107 


5 


10 


6 


14 


142 


N-400(Pet.for Naturalization) 1,174 


238 


183 


200 


191 


1,986 


N-401( Repatriation) 1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


3 


N-402(Petition Nat. of Child) 57 


40 


9 


16 


10 


132 


N-426( Verification Mil.Serv.) 22 


- 


3 


6 


- 


31 


N-565( Duplicate Certificate) 122 


18 


11 


17 


13 


181 


N-577(Cit. Verification Abroad) 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


N-585(Info. from Records 160 


5 


16 


18 


15 


214 


N-600(Deriv. Cert. Application) 231 


47 


28 


102 


55 


463 


Other Naturalization Forms 1 


14 


7 


1 


7 


30 


Page Total 12,173 


3,388 


4,322 


3,237 


4,422 


27,542 



2 
O 
H 
C/5 

8 

EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 2,601 


k 
- 1 S3 

402 


I 

752 


1 

O 

2 a 
.202 


w 

H 
0) 
W 
O 

a 

444 


<C 
H 
O 
H 

4^401 


Affidavit of Support 1^925 


1591 


299 


1.19 


322 


2,824 


Affidavit of Facts 63 


6 


82 j 


1 


10 


162 


Certificate of Identity 19 


- 


5 


- 


- 


24 


U. S.S. R. Exit Permit 31 


- 


2 


- 


1 


34 


Polish Assurance 64 


6 


23 


6 


30 


129 


Other Notarial 360 


231 


83 


76 


81 


831 


Cuban Assurance 67 


- 


249 


- 


- 


316 


ES-575(Labor Clearance) 31 


- 


9 


- 


- 


40 


"AO" Form( Cuban Biograph. Info. ) 41 


- 


- 


- 


- 


41 


OTHER SERVICES 8,511 


697 


1^413 


250 


729 


11,600 


Change of Status (Cards) 379 


102 


49 


28 


26 


584 


Appearance at Hearings 172 


16 


- 


- 


1 


189 


Interpretation & Trans. 1,577 


26 


294 


- 


237 


2,134 


Letters 6,383 


520 


976 


219 


465 


8,563 


Other 


33 


94 


3 


- 


130 


INTERVIEW 1,632 


398 


62 


366 


161 


2,619 


Newcomer Interview 1,632 


398 


62 


366 


161 


2,619 


Page Total 12 , 744 


1,497 


2,227 


818 


1^334 


18,620 


1st Page Total 12,173 


3,388 


4,322 


3,237 


4,422 


27,542 


GRAND TOTAL 24,917 


4,885 


6,549 


4,055 


5,756 


46,162 



ALL OFFICES 
7/1/65 - 6/30/66 


ETHNIC AND NATIONALITY STATISTICS 


WORCESTER 






BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


TOTAL 


Albania 


84 




2 


2 


122 


210 


Algeria 


12 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12 


Antigua 


13 


- 


- 


14 


- 


32 


Argentina 


128 


13 


2 


2 


20 


165 


Armenia (R. or T. ) 


14 


- 


36 


1 


83 


134 


Australia 


25 


- 


2 


4 


10 


41 


Austria 


59 


5 


15 


10 


11 


100 


Bahamas 


17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Barbados 


276 


- 


- 


50 


3 


329 


Belgium 


32 


4 


10 


27 


10 


83 


Bermuda 


29 


2 


L 2 


10 


44 


87 


Bolivia 


20 


- 


i 


2 


1 


24 


Brazil 


84 


30 


7 


3 


6 


130 


Bulgaria 


7 


- 


- 


- 


9 


16 


Canada 


2 ? 203 


99 


924 


474 


516 


4,216 


Ceylon 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Chile 


51 


24 


5 


12 


2 


94 


China 


893 


2X0 


64 


39 


111 


1,317 


Colombia 


328 


30 


19 


8 


40 


425 


Congo 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Costa Rica 


138 


3 


19 


- 


3 


163 


Cuba 


2,493 


3 


988 


52 


203 


3,739 


Cyprus 


3 


- 


3 


- 


- 


6 


Czechoslovakia 


36 


- 


17 


19 


5 


77 


Denmark 


19 


6 


4 


- 


7 


36 


Dominican Republic 


105 


4 


155 


- 


4 


268 


Ecuador 


74 


- 


55 


29 


2 


160 


Egypt 


104 


26 


19 


5 


31 


185 


El Salvador 


12 


- 


2 


- 


- 


14 


England 


503 


62 


126 


217 


139 


1,047 


Estonia 


3 


3 


1 


7 


4 


18 


Finland 


35 


- 


2 


4 


35 


76 


Formosa 


8 


- 


- 


6 


1 


15 


France 


232 


35 j 


59 


17 


87 


. 430 


Ga many 


524 


69 i 


K'7 


272 


198 


1.260 


Ghana 


13 


- 1 




- 


- 


13 


Greece 


J- m * ' t. / _J 


^6 


SiO 


248 


407 


3,128 


Guatemala 


27 


8 


1 


1 


- 


37 


Guiana 


28 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28 


Haiti 


196 


3 


9 


9 


2 


219 


Honduras 


155 


2 


10 


- 


- 


167 


Hong Kong 


57 


12 


2 


- 


16 


87 


Hungary 


109 


7 


40 


21 


83 


260 


Iceland 


4 


7 


1 


5 


- 


17 


India 


80 


9 


46 


14 


104 


253 


Indonesia 


42 


- 


6 


68 


13 


129 


Iran 


12 


- 


33 


- 


9 


114 


Iraq__ 


27 


1 


2 


4 


2 


36 


Ireland 


1,273 


15 


54 


172 


134 


1,648 


Israel 


40 


- 


18 


2 


35 


95 


Italy 


4,883 


41 


1,087 


371 


1,153 


7,535 


PAGE TOTAL 


17,201 


771 


4,856 


2,201 


3,665 


28,694 





BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 


Jamaica 


410 


,_, 


1 


275 


18 


704 


Japan 


58 


15 


8 


72 


24 


177 


Jordan 


30 


3 


17 


14 


12 


76 


Kenya 


20 


- 


- 


- 


3 


23 


Korea 


41 


7 


26 


32 


40 


146 


Latvia 


93 


3 


9 


- 


6 


111 


Lebanon 


97 


40 


362 


55 


53 


607 


Liberia 


11 


- 


' - 


- 


- 


11 


Libya 


9 


- 


1 


2 


1 


13 


Lithuania 


219 


- 


30 


5 


74 


328 


Malaya 


- 


3 


- 


3 


- 


6 


Malta 


1 


- 


- 


3 


- 


4 


Mexico 


38 


4 


7 


19 


8 


76 


Montserrat 


192 


- 


- 


- 


- 


192 


Morocco 


8 


4 


- 


6 


- 


18 


Netherlands 


112 


- 


7 


22 


30 


171 


New Zealand 


8 


2 


— 


13 


2 


25 


Nicaragua 


11 






- 


- 


11 


Norway 


34 


45 


5 


1 


8 


93 


Other Countries 


120 


- 


- 


24 


8 


152 


Pakistan 


15 


- 


- 


- 


24 


39 


Palestine 


64 


- 


59 


- 


6 


129 


Panama 


97 


1 


- 


27 


7 


132 


Paraguay 


14 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14 


Peru 


84 


- 


- 


18 


4 


106 


Philippines 


249 


12 


4 


23 


18 


306 


Poland 


1,052 


183 


391 


319 


666 


2,611 


Portugal 


1,254 


3,203 


210 


142 


42 


4,851 


Puerto Rico 


12 


- 


1 


- 


o 
o 


16 


Rumania 


57 


— 


10 


- 


9 


76 


Saudi Arabia 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Scotland 


113 


16 


44 


51 


57 


281 


South Africa 


26 


- 


- 


- 


1 


27 


Spain 


91 


19 


19 


34 


31 


194 


St. Lucia 


- 


— 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Sudan 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


3 


Sweden 


44 


6 


5 


8 


45 


108 


Switzerland 


71 


- 


5 


i 6 


1 U 


93 


Syria 


64 


I 1 


23 


i 10 


13 


1 113 


Thailand 


12 


i 


1 


- 


6 


18 


Trinidad 


70 


2 


- 


4 


7 


83 


Turkey 


278 


1 


68 


26 


107 


480 


Ukraine 


36 


5 


- 


6 


2 


49 


U.S.S.R. 


295 


2 


18 


45 


21 


381 


United States 


1,812 


528 


341 


553 


700 


3,934 


Uruguay 


18 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


18 


Venezuela 


62 


- 


6 


3 


4 


75 


Vietnam 


3 


- 


3 


- 


1 


7 


Wales 


6 


- 


4 


- 


- 


10 


West Indies (OtherJ_ 


141 


9 


- 


15 


2 


167 


Yugoslavia 


164 


- 


4 


16 


15 


199 


Page Total 
1st Page Total 


7,716 
17,201 


4,114 
771 


1,693 
4,856 


1,854 
2,201 


2,091 
3,665 


17,468 
28,694 


GRAND TOTAL 


24,917 


4,885 


6,549 


4,055 


5,756 


46,162 



LOCALITI ES 



Fiscal Year 7/1/65 ■ 


• 6/30/66 

BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


All Offices 






WORCESTER 


TOTAL 


Abington 


19 






— * 




19 


Acton 


3 


- 


20 


- 


- 


23 


Acushnet 


- 


11 


- 


- 


- 


11 


Adams 


3 


- 


- 


8 


- 


11 


Agawam 


- 


Mi 


- 


71 


- 


71 


Ames bury 


8 


- 


4 


1 


- 


13 


Amherst 


1 


- 


- 


33 


- 


34 


Andover 


1 


- 


143 


- 


- 


144 


Arlington 


321 


• 


3 


- 


- 


324 


Ash by 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Ashland 


17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Athol 


1 


- 


- 


- 


4 


5 


Attleboro 


8 


113 


7 


- 


- 


121 


Auburn 


1 




I 


- 


86 


87 


Avon 


11 


- 


— 


- 


- 


11 


Ayer 


58 


• 


7 


- 


5 


70 


Barnstable 


40 


11 




. 


.,_ 


51 


Barre 


1 


- 


- 


- 


8 


9 


Bedford 


27 


- 


5 


- 


*~ 


32 


Belchertown 


- 


— 


- 


9 


- 


9 


Bellingham 


26 


- 


1 


- 


- 


27 


Belmont 


274 


- 


14 


- 


- 


288 


Beverly 


67 


- 


1 


- 


- 


68 


Billerica 


48 


- 


3 


- 


- 


51 


Blandford 


- 


— 




8 


- 


8 


Boston 


11,333 


16 


113 


5 


32 


11,499 


Bourne 


3 


2 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Boxborough 


2 


— 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Boxford 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Boylston 


- 


— 


- 


- 


23 


23 


Braintree 


69 


- 


- 


- 


- 


69 


Bridgewater 


10 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1.1 


Brockton 


176 


- 


4 


t* 


- i 


185 


Brockfisld 


- 


- 


- ! 


-! 


23 | 


23 


Brookli~>3 


769 1 




7 ] 




- i 


776 


Burlington 


63 ! 


- 


2 


- 


- 


65 


Cambridge 


1,723 


7 


23 






1,753 


Canton 


41 


- 


- 


- 


- 


41 


Carlisle 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Charlton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24 


24 


Chelmsford 


10 


- 


40 


- 


- 


50 


Chelsea 


360 


- 


3 


- 


— 


363 


Chester 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Chicopee 


7 


- 


- 


641 


- 


648 


Clinton 


7 


- 


-. 


- 


122 


129 


Cohasset 


1 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


Concord 


33 


- 


. . 2 


- 


4 


39 

















BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 


Danvers 43 


. 


11 




. 


54 


Dartmouth 6 


168 


- 


- 


- 


174 


Dedham 113 


- 


2 


- 


- 


115 


Deerf ield 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Dennis 6 


- 


2 


- 


- 


8 


Dighton 


12 


- 


- 


- 


12 


Douglas 


- 


- 


- 


8 


8 


Dover 8 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Dracut 8 


- 


84 


- 


- 


92 


Dudley 


- 


- 


- 


104 


104 


Duxbury 6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


East Bridge water 4 










4 


East Brookfield 


- 


- 


- 


5 


5 


East Longmeadow 2 


- 


- 


33 


- 


35 


Easthampton 


- 


- 


4 


- 


4 


Easton 5 


1 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Egremont 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Essex 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Everett 357 


- 


4 


- 


- 


361 


Fair haven 


106 








106 


Fall River 9 


2,440 


- 


- 


- 


2,449 


Falmouth 40 


31 


- 


- 


- 


71 


Fitchburg 5 


- 


- 


- 


58 


63 


Foxborough 9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Framingham 194 


- 


4 


- 


3 


201 


Franklin 48 


— 


- 


- 


- 


48 


Freetown 


16 


- 


- 


- 


16 


Gardner 2 






. 


57 


59 


Georgetown 


- 


4 


- 


- 


4 


Gill 


— 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Gloucester 174 


— 


2 


- 


- 


176 


Grafton 


- 


- 


- 


99 


99 


Granby 


— 


- 


15 




15 


Granville 


— 


- 


2 


- i 2 


Greenfield l 


- 


_ 


7 - J 8 


Grotcn - } 


1 


- 1 - : i 


Grove land 7 


11 






18 


Hadley 






5 




5 


Hamilton 25 


— 


— 


- 


- 


25 


Hanover 2 


— 


— 


- 


- 


2 


Hanson 33 


5 


- 


- 


- 


38 


Hardwick 


- 


- 


— 


13 


13 


Harvard 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Harwich 5 


— 


— 


- 


- 


5 


Hatfield 


- 


- 


8 


— 


8 


Haverhill 16 


- 


451 


- 


— 


467 


Hingham 28 


- 


- 


— 


— 


28 


Holbrook 52 


- 


- 


— 


— 


52 


Holden 1 


- 


- 


- 


85 


86 















BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 


Nahant 9 










9 


Nantucket 1 


m 


1 


- 


- 


2 


Natick 179 


- 


4 


- 


1 


184 


Needham 46 


- 


- 


- 


2 


48 


New Bedford 61 


1,412 


- 


- 


- 


1,473 


New Braintree 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Newbury 4 


- 


2 


- 


- 


6 


Newburyport 4 


- 


6 


- 


- 


10 


Newton 700 


- 


7 


— 


- 


707 


Norfolk 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


North Adams 2 


- 


- 


3 


- 


5 


North Andover 1 


- 


88 


- 


- 


89 


North Attleborough 


4 


- 


- 


- 


4 


North Brookf ield 


- 


- 


- 


7 


7 


North Reading 10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


Northampton 


- 


- 


76 


- 


76 


Northborough 2 


- 


- 


- 


68 


70 


Northbridge 4 


- 


- 


- 


7 


11 


Norton 20 


4 


- 


- 


- 


24 


Norwell 2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Norwood 93 


— 


- 


- 


1 


94 


Orange 








2 


2 


Otis 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Oxford 


- 


- 


- 


27 


27 


Palmer 1 






31 


mm 


32 


Paxton 


— 


— 


- 


32 


32 


Peabody 287 


- 


7 


- 


- 


294 


Pelham 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Pembroke 7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


Pepperell 2 


- 


8 


- 


- 


10 


Phillipston 


- 


- 


- 


4 


4 


Pittsfield 10 


- 


- 


14 


1 


25 


Plainville 4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Plymouth 9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Princeton 


- 


- 


- 


4 


4 


Provincctown 8 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Quincy 367 




7 


. 


4 


378 


Randolph 63 


4 


-< 


- 




67 


Raynham 6 


6 


- 


- 


- 


12 


Reading 27 


- 


3 


- 


- 


30 


Rehoboth 4 


5 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Revere 263 


- 


- 


- 


- 


263 


Rochester 3 


5 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Rockland 41 


- 


- 


- 


- 


41 


Rockport 6 


- 


3 


- 


- 


9 


Rowley 4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Russell 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Rutland 2 


- 


- 


- 


31 


33 















BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 


Holliston 22 


„ 


Lg 




1 


23 


Holyoke 5 


- 


- 


294 


- 


299 


Hope dale 


- 


- 


- 


4 


4 


Hopkinton 1 


- 


- 


- 


4 


5 


Hudson 50 


- 


- 


- 


10 


60 


Hull 47 


- 


- 


- 


- 


47 


Ipswich 41 




7 


. 




48 


Kingston 2 


2 




. 


_ 


4 


Lancaster 6 


. 






109 


115 


Lawrence 24 


- 


2,883 


- 


- 


2,907 


Leicester 6 


- 


- 


- 


52 


58 


Le nox 2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


Leominster 20 


- 


- 


- 


36 


56 


Lexington 96 


- 


- 


- 


- 


96 


Lincoln 44 


- 


2 


- 


- 


46 


Littleton 2 


- 


4 


- 


- 


6 


Longraeadow 1 


- 


- 


38 


- 


39 


Lowell 56 


- 


1,823 


- 


- 


1,879 


Ludlow 4 


- 


- 


137 


^ 


141 


Lunenburg 1 


- 


- 


- 




1 


Lynn 383 


- 


39 


- 


6 


428 


Lynnfield 23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23 


Maiden 271 






... 


2 


273 


Manchester 5 


— 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Mansfield 32 


• 


— 


- 


- 


32 


Marblehead 20 


- 


1 


- 


- 


21 


Marion 2 


5 


- 


- 


- 


7 


Marlborough 75 


- 


1 


- 


49 


125 


Mar.shfield 14 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14 


Mattapoisett 1 


4 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Maynard 27 


- 


- 


- 


mm 


27 


Medfiel'd 20j 


- 


— 


- 


- 


20 


Medford 522 


- 


ii 


- j 9 j 542 


Medv;ay 2 


— 


- i 


2 


Melross 94 j 


5 


- j 


99 


Men^on 1 


— 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Merrimac 


— 


2 


— 


- 


2 


Methuen 10 


4 


372 


- 


- 


386 


Middleborough 


20 


— 


- 


!•■ 


20 


Middleton 8 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Milford 16 


5 


8 


- 


134 


163 


Millbury 


- 


- 


— 


42 


42 


Millis 7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


Millville 3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Milton 61 


- 


— 


— 


— 


61 


Monson 


- 


— 


4 


— 


4 


Montague 1 


- 


- 


5 


- 


6 


• 










- 





BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 


Salem 


123 


. 


2 






125 


Salisbury 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


i 3 


Saugus 


48 


- 


- 


- 


- 


48 


Scituate 


118 


- 


- 


•» 


- 


118 


Seekonk 


1 


12 


- 


- 


- 


13 


Sharon 


37 


- 


- 


- 


- 


37 


Sheffield 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


She r born 


8 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Shirley 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Shrewsbury 


1 


- 


1 


- 


217 


219 


Somerset 


- 


126 


- 


- 


m» 


126 


Some rvi lie 


1,100 


2 


8 


- 


7 


1,117 


South Hadley 


- 


- 


- 


36 


- 


36 


Southampton 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Southborough 


5 


- 


- 


- 


1 


6 


Southbridge 


3 


- 


- 


- 


126 


129 


Southwick 


- 


- 


- 


23 


- 


23 


Spencer 


9 


- 


- 


- 


41 


50 


Springfield 


6 


- 


3 


2,172 


1 


2,182 


Stoneham 


73 


- 


1 


- 


9 


83 


Stoughton 


31 


3 


7 


- 


- 


41 


Stow 


5 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Sturbridge 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


5 


Sudbury 


9 


— 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Sunderland 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Sutton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


11 


Swamps cot t 


78 


- 


- 




- 


78 


Swansea 


- 


102 


- 


- 


- 


102 


Taunton 


18 


156 






. 


174 


Tewksbury 


18 


- 


35 


- 


- 


53 


Townsend 


10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


Truro 


16 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


Tyngsborough 


- 


- 


13 


- 


- 


13 


Upton 










3 


3 


Uxbridge 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26 


26 


Wakefield 


101 

30 j 




6 






107 


Walpols 


- 


- 






30 


Waltham 


379 


- 


3 


«• 


- 


382 


Ware 


- 


- 


- 


6 


3 


9 


Warehan 


9 


23 


- 


- 


- 


32 


Warren 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


4 


Watertown 


644 


- 


17 


- 


3 


664 


Way land 


18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18 


Webster 


2 


- 


- 


- 


186 


188 


Wellesley 


101 


1 


- 


- 


7 


109 


Wenham 


19 


- 


2 


- 


- 


21 


West Boylston 


-' 


- 


- 


- 


68 


68 


West Bridgewater 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


West Brookfield 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


West Newbury 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


5 

















BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 


West Springfield 






144 


mm 


144 


We st borough 11 


mm 


- 


- 


64 


75 


Westfield 


- 


- 


100 


- 


100 


Westford 2 


- 


28 


- 


- 


30 


Weston 36 


- 


mm 


- 


- 


36 


Westport 1 


39 


- 


- 


- 


40 


We st wood 13 


- 


- 


mm 


- 


13 


Weymouth 53 


- 


- 


Mi 


- 


53 


Whately 


- 


WW 


1 


- 


1 


Whitman 10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


Wilbraham 


- 


- 


38 


- 


38 


Williams town 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Wilmington 44 


- 


3 


- 


- 


47 


Winchester 87 


- 


7 


- 


4 


98 


Winthrop 33 


- 


- 


- 


1 


34 


Woburn 99 


mm 


19 


- 


- 


118 


Worcester 18 


- 


9 


- 


3,551 


3,578 


Wrentham 3 


1 


mm 


- 


•» 


4 


Yarmouth 3 


mm 








3 


Out of State 437 


mm 


112 


53 


6 


608 


TOTAL 24,917 


4,885 


6,549 


4,055 


5,756 


46,162 



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